Economic Woman

Econometrics, gender, equity and more.

I need your help

with 9 comments

I’m currently preparing for a guest posting stint over at Feministe, which will start in about a week. I’m planning to make a series of posts about why women, and feminists, should care about economics. I’ve got lots of ideas of my own, but since this blog’s audience is often pretty skewed towards the econ side, I thought I’d ask for suggestions.

Economists, feminist economists, feminists who care about economics – what do you wish your fellow feminists knew about economics? Is there a particular concept that is often misunderstood? A branch of research they should pay more attention to?

If you make a suggestion that I haven’t thought up myself already, and I use it, I’ll be happy to credit you for the idea by name, link, or both. Of course, you’ll just have to trust me on that one.

This is probably a good moment to point out that I have finally secured myself a blog email address. It is: economicwoman AT gmail DOT com. Please send along your comments and criticism, unless you’re going to tell me to post more often. It’s on my list, right below “register for GREs” and “make sure you pass statistics”.

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Written by Allison

5 July 2008 at 3:24 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

9 Responses

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  1. […] Help her out: I’m currently preparing for a guest posting stint over at Feministe, which will start in about a week. I’m planning to make a series of posts about why women, and feminists, should care about economics. I’ve got lots of ideas of my own, but since this blog’s audience is often pretty skewed towards the econ side, I thought I’d ask for suggestions. […]

  2. I’d love to see some knowledgeable and expert discussion of the gender pay gap. I have heard quite a lot recently about how the gap now is just because women take time off to have children and over a lifetime that 5 years (say) out explains the difference.

    Firstly, I don’t know whether that is true.

    Secondly, this is used by some neoclassical economists (I think) as basically the end of the story. That explains the gender pay gap, so the gender pay gap is therefore not something to complain about. That rings false and inadequate to me – an economic system that penalises women for a biological inevitability (ie they have the children so chances are they are the ones who will have the time out of the workplace) has a major flaw, but I don’t know what the alternatives are.

    Katherine

    6 July 2008 at 7:43 am

  3. I always hear a lot about how part of why women make less money (usually) than their male counterparts is that they’re less likely to negotiate salary or ask for a raise. What’s your take on this? Is this a factor? Is it a major factor? How do we combat it?

    Lauren

    6 July 2008 at 10:37 am

  4. How about something regarding how many (radical) feminists are still heavily influenced by Marxist ideology? Admittedly this is usually for social analysis, but it seems to spill into economics as well.

    Mike

    6 July 2008 at 12:16 pm

  5. How about a post on the current account deficit and its impact on the ability of our economy to produce enough good jobs to provide more opportunities for women and the rest of our society? You might also want to include thoughts on how to reduce it without hurting our most vulnerable citizens (e.g. would quotas be better than tariffs).

    Alabama Tribune

    6 July 2008 at 6:33 pm

  6. Seconding Mike’s request for explanation of Marxism. Until I started reading feminist blogs all I learned about communism was that it was teh evil. Ditto socialism. I’ve been exposed a little bit to the problems of capitalism, but don’t really understand how the alternatives are to be made to work on an economic level. Well, I mean besides the so-called gift economy model, as for open source, and that only kicks in once essential needs are covered.

    @Lauren: wasn’t there some Feministe post about asking for a raise that was “damned if you do, damned if you don’t”? A woman asking for a raise is bitchy and unfeminine, and it can actually hurt worse than saying nothing. And not asking ain’t so great either. I’m sure I saw a study *somewhere*.

    woodland sunflower

    7 July 2008 at 6:42 am

  7. There is a simple message that never seems to get through. It is good sense for employers to choose the woman candidate (and/or candidates from other groups subject to negative prejudice) when candidates are approximately equal. The reason is that the employer can expect better value from the candidate that others are prejudiced against . These candidates have a labour market hurdle of prejudice to overcome and therefore can be expected to be the people who try harder. And candidates for a job or a promotion are approximately equal as often as not. Simple employer self interest should be a far more reliable friend to women in the job market than any form of legal regulation.

    That will not close the gender pay gap quickly but it can and should grind the gap away.

    Diversity

    7 July 2008 at 9:21 am

  8. Thanks for the ideas, everyone!

    @woodland sunflower: This might not be the post that you’re thinking of, but I made roughly that point in this post.

    Allison

    8 July 2008 at 3:21 pm

  9. I think that feminist economists have deeply engaged Marxism for a long time. Heidi Hartmann’s “Unhappy Marriage” essay is a key moment. But it would be unfortunate if feminist economics was presented as Marxism with women stirred in. I think that feminist economists have exposed major gaps across all of the mainstream and heterodox schools of economics. It would be useful to English department feminists (I belong to this group) to understand that feminist economists are more often than not trained in mainstream departments and that they use a broad range of tools.

    The capability approach needs some serious marketing. I really hope that you cover Amartya Sen’s work.

    Raj

    9 July 2008 at 2:21 pm


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